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Amyloid and metabolic positron emission tomography imaging of cognitively normal adults with Alzheimer's parents.

TitleAmyloid and metabolic positron emission tomography imaging of cognitively normal adults with Alzheimer's parents.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsMosconi L, Rinne JO, Tsui WH, Murray J, Li Y, Glodzik L, McHugh P, Williams S, Cummings M, Pirraglia E, Goldsmith SJ, Vallabhajosula S, Scheinin N, Viljanen T, Någren K, de Leon MJ
JournalNeurobiol Aging
Volume34
Issue1
Pagination22-34
Date Published2013 Jan
ISSN1558-1497
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Alzheimer Disease, Amyloid, Aniline Compounds, Brain, Brain Mapping, Cognition Disorders, Female, Fluorodeoxyglucose F18, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neuropsychological Tests, Positron-Emission Tomography, Psychiatric Status Rating Scales, Sensitivity and Specificity, Thiazoles
Abstract

This study examines the relationship between fibrillar beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition and reduced glucose metabolism, a proxy for neuronal dysfunction, in cognitively normal (NL) individuals with a parent affected by late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). Forty-seven 40-80-year-old NL received positron emission tomography (PET) with (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) and 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG). These included 19 NL with a maternal history (MH), 12 NL with a paternal history (PH), and 16 NL with negative family history of AD (NH). Automated regions of interest, statistical parametric mapping, voxel-wise intermodality correlations, and logistic regressions were used to examine cerebral-to-cerebellar PiB and FDG standardized uptake value ratios across groups. The MH group showed higher PiB retention and lower metabolism in AD regions compared with NH and PH, which were negatively correlated in posterior cingulate, frontal, and parieto-temporal regions (Pearson r ≤ -0.57, p ≤ 0.05). No correlations were observed in NH and PH. The combination of Aβ deposition and metabolism yielded accuracy ≥ 69% for MH vs. NH and ≥ 71% for MH vs. PH, with relative risk = 1.9-5.1 (p values < 0.005). NL individuals with AD-affected mothers show co-occurring Aβ increases and hypometabolism in AD-vulnerable regions, suggesting an increased risk for AD.

DOI10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2012.03.002
Alternate JournalNeurobiol. Aging
PubMed ID22503001
PubMed Central IDPMC3402654
Grant ListM01 RR000096-47 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG022374 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
M01 RR000096 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG035137 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
AG035137 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R21 AG032554 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG013616 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
P30 AG008051 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
AG022374 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
AG032554 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG035137-03 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG022374-08 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
AG13616 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG013616-20 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R21 AG032554-02 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States

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