Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine appointments are available to our patients. Sign up for Connect today to schedule your vaccination. Continue your routine care with us by scheduling an in-person appointment or Video Visit.

Declining brain glucose metabolism in normal individuals with a maternal history of Alzheimer disease.

TitleDeclining brain glucose metabolism in normal individuals with a maternal history of Alzheimer disease.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsMosconi L, Mistur R, Switalski R, Brys M, Glodzik L, Rich K, Pirraglia E, Tsui W, De Santi S, de Leon MJ
JournalNeurology
Volume72
Issue6
Pagination513-20
Date Published2009 Feb 10
ISSN1526-632X
KeywordsAged, Aged, 80 and over, Aging, Alzheimer Disease, Brain, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Glucose, Heterozygote, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Mothers
Abstract

BACKGROUND: At cross-section, cognitively normal individuals (NL) with a maternal history of late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) have reduced glucose metabolism (CMRglc) on FDG-PET in the same brain regions as patients with clinical AD as compared to those with a paternal and a negative family history (FH) of AD. This longitudinal FDG-PET study examines whether CMRglc reductions in NL subjects with a maternal history of AD are progressive.

METHODS: Seventy-five 50- to 82-year-old NL received 2-year follow-up clinical, neuropsychological, and FDG-PET examinations. These included 37 subjects with negative family history of AD (FH-), 9 with paternal (FHp), and 20 with maternal AD (FHm). Two subjects had parents with postmortem confirmed AD. Statistical parametric mapping was used to compare CMRglc across FH groups at baseline, follow-up, and longitudinally.

RESULTS: At both time points, the FH groups were comparable for demographic and neuropsychological characteristics. At baseline and at follow-up, FHm subjects showed CMRglc reductions in the parieto-temporal, posterior cingulate, and medial temporal cortices as compared to FH- and FHp (p < 0.001). Longitudinally, FHm had significant CMRglc declines in these regions, which were significantly greater than those in FH- and FHp (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: A maternal history of Alzheimer disease (AD) predisposes normal individuals to progressive CMRglc reductions in AD-vulnerable brain regions, which may be related to a higher risk for developing AD.

DOI10.1212/01.wnl.0000333247.51383.43
Alternate JournalNeurology
PubMed ID19005175
PubMed Central IDPMC2677512
Grant ListR01 AG022374 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
M01 RR000096 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
MO1RR0096 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG013616 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
P30 AG008051 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG012101 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
AG022374 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
AG13616 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
AG08051 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
AG12101 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States

Weill Cornell Medicine Neurology 525 E. 68th St.
PO Box 117
New York, NY 10065 Phone: (212) 746-6575